International, Innovation and Investment in NATA

June 20, 2016

Greetings from Washington! With Congress still looking for a path forward on a long-term FAA reauthorization and the ongoing controversy surrounding the House Transportation Committee proposal to split the FAA into public and private organizations, it is as important as ever to remain engaged, informed and active in helping your NATA staff communicate directly and effectively with your nation’s lawmakers. Bill Deere provides the latest information as we go to press in his column. Please help us ensure our voice remains strong and consistent. NATA continues to make progress on several other fronts. Here are a few highlights.

NATA’s international presence continues to grow rapidly and Safety 1st products are leading the way. Tim Obitts, our Senior Vice President of Membership and Business Development and Mike France, NATA’s Managing Director of Safety and Training just recently returned from attending EBACE in Geneva, Switzerland. NATA’s presence and the buzz around our industry-leading Safety 1st training programs are driving greatly increased international interest and adoption. By working with the International Business Aviation Council to roll out the International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling (IS-BAH), NATA’s footprint is now rapidly growing abroad. To help showcase this continued growth, the NATA staff recently created an interactive electronic world map on NATA’s website for members to see where Safety 1st and NATA are expanding (www.fbostatus.com or www.groundhandlerstatus.com). Please take a look and see which of your competitors is taking advantage of this world class training. In addition, we can use member assistance in reaching out to those in the industry that are advertising NATA membership and Safety 1st Training, yet are not currently participating as either NATA members or Safety 1st graduates. This creates a potential competitive disadvantage for those continuing to support the expansion and continued improvement of this clearly top shelf training. Please let us know if you are aware of anyone mistakenly advertising their participation so we can follow up with some outreach to clear up any misunderstandings.

This quarter’s Aviation Business Journal features a very interesting article on JetSuite’s foray into scheduled Part 135 operations in the Western U.S. As the major airlines continue to reduce service to smaller markets and regional airlines struggle to fill cockpit seats, this is creating vacuums and for some, opportunities. NATA members are all very entrepreneurial and agile. This is clearly evident by those that successfully navigated the post financial crisis downturn. Member companies like JetSuite continue to look for opportunities to create their own niche and hopefully, success, in the marketplace. Many industry veterans might view these innovative efforts with some degree of skepticism, but let’s face it, the economy, consumers and the competitive landscape are all evolving and NATA’s members are always looking for new paths to ensure success.

Over these last few years, NATA’s voice in Washington has grown stronger; however, the need to ensure general aviation businesses continue as a stronger voice in Washington is greater than ever. As I often like to say, for some, a strong trade association is like insurance—you only need it when you need it. Fortunately for all of us, leaders from around the world recognize that by unifying business leaders around a common purpose, the industry’s destiny is much more controllable as long as the foundation is built upon an active and engaged membership.

As NATA kicks off the second annual Aviation Business Conference in Washington, please recommit to attending and supporting the unique opportunity this member-driven conference presents. The ability to speak directly with the TSA Administrator or the FAA’s top regulator or key Congressmen and Senators or to network with colleagues to generate new business opportunities are great reasons to attend this event. Take advantage of the convenience meetings such as this provide to foster multiple parts of your businesses’ growth strategy. The Aviation Business Conference is sure to provide many opportunities and attending helps support NATA’s efforts in Washington.

Please lend your support and plan to spend some time with NATA’s staff while attending any of our events. They all do a great job of helping tell the story of aviation businesses growing, innovating and investing in the economy, both here and around the world.

Republished from Q2 2016 Aviation Business Journal


Greetings from Washington!

April 22, 2016

As we go to press with this ABJ issue, NATA is in the midst of an intense lobbying campaign to help shape the House version of the FAA Reauthorization Bill titled, “The Aviation Innovation, Reform, and Reauthorization (AIRR) Act. Our Senior Vice President for Government and External Affairs, Bill Deere, will provide a fuller “from the trenches” view of our team’s lobbying efforts; but, before that, let’s cover a few points on NATA’s multi-year strategy that is now bearing fruit as we ensure that the Voice of Aviation Business is heard loudly and clearly by legislators and other policy makers. NATA began laying the groundwork for this ongoing effort almost four years ago. By quietly and respectfully building key relationships, NATA’s reputation, relevance and view as an “honest broker” in Washington is yielding needed access, at this critical time, that is vital to ensuring your voice is heard. Throughout this period, NATA’s team sought solutions and focused on listening to both our members and policy makers.

At the same time, through multiple meetings with lawmakers and administration officials, our staff worked diligently to educate the Hill and federal agencies on NATA’s unique and critical membership and how seemingly well-intended policy prescriptions can have a detrimental impact on small businesses.

This provided the framework to develop thoughtful and member-driven policy positions for this key legislation. Further, to be most effective, these are relationships that must endure over time. It is folly to view policy debates as zero-sum game transactions. While we sometimes disagree with key policy makers, we continue to be respectful and solution oriented. Why is this so critical? The politics of Washington will grind on long after the fate of one piece of legislation is decided. Maintaining long-term, respectful relationships is the most effective way to guarantee the enduring effectiveness of NATA long into the future.

House Transportation Committee Chairman Shuster released the specific language of the AIRR Act on February 3, 2016, then very quickly followed with a hearing six days later, and a full committee vote the following day. Although Chairman Shuster revealed some broad details over the last year, NATA did not have access to the bill’s language prior to its release. Going back to our point on enduring relationships, we made the decision to “keep our powder dry” and focus on the specifics of the bill prior to launching our advocacy campaign. We did this to ensure we maximized the efforts of NATA’s members at the most appropriate time so our message to lawmakers was not diluted by the passage of time or lack of volume. This strategy is paying off as we speak, but there is still a lot of fighting left to do to ensure aviation businesses remain a key part of this discussion.

With this as a backdrop, here are some key NATA observations on House Transportation Committee Chairman Congressman Bill Shuster’s AIRR Act:

  • On balance, the bill that passed the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee will, in the long term, hurt general aviation businesses. In the U.S., we enjoy the safest, most complex, most diverse system in the world with unparalleled access for general aviation. Contrary to views often driven by academics and economists, from an operator perspective, the air traffic control (ATC) system works very well.
  • A sound bite often tossed around Washington refers to our ATC system as based on “WWII technology.” I invite any proponents of corporatizing ATC to spend some time in any enroute center in the country, the FAA Command Center in Warrenton, VA, the William J. Hughes Technical Center in Atlantic City, NJ, or any of a host of truly high-technology Terminal Radar Approach Control facilities around the nation. Yes, we do use radar as one of the technologies to provide surveillance of aircraft. Other surveillance technologies, including GPS and multi-lateration, are also currently being “fused” with radar data at these high tech facilities. For a point of reference, we also continue to use electricity, first introduced into our homes in the late 19th century. So, just because a particular technology endures, does not necessarily minimize its relevance. ATC is difficult to discuss in sound bites or elevator pitches. It requires a deep operational perspective to truly understand the impacts of massive change to such a highly developed, safe and stable system.
  • We are in no way apologists for the FAA’s struggles in rolling out large modernization programs. The FAA is making progress, albeit slower than anticipated. This is frustrating. However, it is important to understand and reset expectations about the degree of change that is possible and appropriate. Over a decade ago, policy makers in Washington introduced the Next Generation Air Traffic Control System – NextGen. Looking back now, the expectations about the ability to modernize the air traffic control system were unrealistic; and corporatizing the current system will do nothing to ease the challenges ahead. In the meantime, and rarely acknowledged, the FAA successfully built and is integrating three foundational technologies that are providing the framework for future success. Enroute Automation Modernization (ERAM) is now operational at all of the nation’s high altitude enroute centers. The ADS-B ground network is in place and provides surveillance and vital safety information today. And finally, Digital Data Communications (DATACOMM) is rapidly growing at key airports, including Teterboro.
  • Somewhat surprising for a transportation issue, the debate has become infused with ideology, “government—bad, private enterprise—always good.” While we do agree that more private-sector practices would greatly benefit the FAA, we are also urging caution based on the history of other similar efforts. It’s clear that creating government-backed enterprises is no panacea. Organizations similar to the proposed ATC corporation include Sallie Mae, Freddie Mac, the Red Cross, and the Smithsonian and have met with very mixed results.
  • The proposed corporation will, over time, be dominated by the commercial airlines. The long-term impact of this is likely reduced service to small and rural communities with a further reduction of investment in safety-enhancing high technologies in those locations. Why would an airline-dominated board want to invest in areas of the country that they currently don’t, and likely never will, serve?
  • Absent the move to corporatize air traffic control in the U.S., many of the remaining provisions of the Shuster legislation are helpful and will improve the current system. This is a direct result of NATA’s approach to educating our nation’s policy makers on the vital role that general aviation businesses play in the nation’s economy.

Finally, please stay informed with all the tools provided by NATA. Visit http://www.nata.aero/nocorporation to contact your elected representatives and explain that the AIRR Act is bad for small businesses and general aviation. Actions like these are very effective and make a difference. Legislators listen to voters and job creators. Invite your Congressmen and Senators out to your business to show them how important the jobs you provide are to the local community. The time for engagement is upon us. Please stay in touch and let us know how we can help.

Republished from Q1 2016 Aviation Business Journal


Not The Answer for Air Traffic Control

March 21, 2016

The following is the full-length response opinion piece by Tom Hendricks’ excerpted by the Denver Post.

The Denver Post’s March 12th editorial, “The remedy for aviation delays,” endorsing a congressional proposal to create a federally chartered air traffic control corporation, is rooted in a number of factual errors that call into question the basis for the Post’s support. In fact, the creation of a federally chartered, not-for-profit air traffic control corporation will erode aviation system safety, stifle the deployment of new technologies and saddle the traveling public with ever increasing travel costs.

The Post’s first factual misstatement centers on the corporation’s governance. Federally chartering an air traffic control corporation, the Post implies, means the U.S. government somehow supervises it. While such corporations are required to provide annual independent audits and reports to Congress, controversies surrounding such corporations often come down to issues of managerial accountability and fiduciary responsibility. The Post itself noted the record of another such corporation, the Post Office. But other examples include Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, the Red Cross and the Smithsonian. It is notable that each of these federally chartered institutions have required in their history some form of government intervention.

Next, the Post implies the corporation would be overseen by the government. Wrong. The corporation would be controlled by a 13-member board of aviation insiders. In fact, one indisputable fact at the legislative hearing on the proposal – the nation’s airlines would have effective control of the board.

The Post also buys into an argument put forward by many of the principal supporters of this proposal, largely academics and economists, about the level of modernization of the air traffic control system. These experts sorely lack the necessary operational experience and expertise required to develop a fully integrated perspective of the “puts and takes” critical to ensuring a balanced approach to safeguarding the unprecedented level of safety performance that is the hallmark of the U.S. air traffic control system.

Among other things, this lack of real world depth of experience blithely leads to simplistic pronouncements such as “a blip is just a blip” when referring to aircraft displayed on air traffic control systems and similarly, that the U.S. is “using World War II technology” as the foundation for our air traffic control system. These views are simplistic, uninformed and clearly point to an academic, not operational view of reality.

The incredibly robust U.S. air traffic control system is modern, highly-integrated and provides for an extremely high level of continuity in the face of disruptive meteorological and technological challenges. This system was designed with the predominant users of the system in mind – major airlines. One must only visit state-of-the-art FAA facilities like the Atlanta Terminal Radar Approach Control Facility, the FAA Command Center in Warrenton, Virginia, the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center in New Jersey and others to realize that these extremely robust and modern facilities leave “World War II” technology in the dust. These facilities, along with the Enroute Automation Modernization-equipped high altitude enroute air traffic control centers, are already fusing multiple sensor sources, including radar, Global Positioning System inputs and other sources into these highly-integrated systems.

We understand the idea of creating an air traffic control corporation is appealing to many, including the Post, as a way to address budgetary stability at the FAA. But doesn’t the Department of Defense deserve a little budgetary stability? What about federal law enforcement or programs to assist the poor with their heating bills, could they use a little budget stability? The FAA isn’t the only part of the federal budget that needs relief from political in-fighting over the budget.

Air traffic control is a monopoly and the governance of this proposed corporation is already precooked in the proposal endorsed by the Post to pick its winners and losers, leaving the consumer and general aviation largely on the outside looking in.


A Time to Reflect… Now Let’s Focus On the Next 75 Years!

December 28, 2015

 

December 28, 2015 marks a very auspicious accomplishment for NATA. We are very pleased to celebrate our 75th Anniversary as the leading voice of aviation businesses in our country, and beyond. In this issue of the Aviation Business Journal, please take a few minutes to read about our storied history in a great article authored by Paul Seidenman & David J. Spanovich, “NATA – For 75 Years, The Voice of General Aviation Business.”

Reflecting back on the early days of what we know today as NATA, I remain amazed and proud that industry leaders—with a clear vision and mission—organized, united and led NATA’s members on a path that continues to ensure our voices are heard clearly in the aviation industry, the Halls of Congress, before federal agencies, and in the states. We will forever be indebted to William A. Ong, Leslie H. Bowman and many others whose vision and dedication remain the hallmarks of our association.

However, these great leaders truly owe their success—and the continuing success of NATA—to the scores of current and former volunteer leaders who over these past 75 years generously donated their time and resources to actively help guide our efforts. These volunteers include NATA board members, committee members and the many others we call upon to provide views on a host of issues. As I’ve repeatedly said over these last few years, this is your association and volunteering to participate helps guarantee our success well into the future. The NATA staff needs your expertise when advocating with our colleagues, at the FAA, and on Capitol Hill. Clear, well-defined policy priorities succeed when driven by NATA members.

Looking ahead, the future of NATA is bright as we embark on our next 75 years. There are several guideposts that will help ensure we remain relevant, respected and a valuable resource for our members and the nation’s policymakers.

  • Growing our suite of safety enhancing training products will be front and center moving forward. Safety 1st is recognized as the gold standard for general aviation businesses. NATA will continue to thoughtfully expand this highly beneficial program into other areas to ensure our members continue to enjoy cutting edge products that drive safety improvements and translate to the bottom line. This will become particularly more important considering FAA Administrator Michael Huerta’s commitment to moving the agency from an “enforcement” regime to one of “compliance.” This “sea change” dovetails extremely well with safety management principles now rapidly maturing. Even though the FAA’s philosophy shift will likely take years to fully implement, programs like Safety 1st will become ever more vital to ensuring our members properly manage risk in their businesses.
  • Moving forward, NATA must remain agile in a changing business environment, must stay relevant to both members and in policy debates in Washington and beyond and most importantly, must continue to be responsive to our members’ needs. We will work with NATA’s board to ensure our by-laws and organizational structure continue to demonstrate the
    most effectiveness and value for NATA’s members.
  • NATA will continue to actively manage strategic rela­tionships to ensure our voice is heard. We’ll do this by being good listeners, solution-oriented, non-partisan and closing on commitments we make. These are long-term commitments that will garner respect and influ­ence to ensure The Voice of Aviation Business remains a key player in Washington and beyond.
  • The recently announced purchase of the Independent Fixed Base Operators Association (IFBOA) is already jumpstarting our membership rolls and bringing a vitally important constituency to NATA, ensuring we truly speak as one voice on Capitol Hill. In the coming months, this move, along with our updated products and services will ensure we remain a vibrant and grow­ing trade association for many years to come.

In closing, it’s an honor to lead your trade association and to work with our highly dedicated NATA staff and volun­teers. This is a winning combination that is going to ensure our future remains bright. Please participate and remain engaged in NATA’s activities. We need your great ideas and guidance to help ensure The Voice of Aviation Business grows even stronger for our members!

Republished from Q4 2015 Aviation Business Journal


Greetings From Washington

October 30, 2015

There are many exciting things happening at NATA so let’s jump right in.

NATA Purchases the Independent FBO Association (IFBOA)
As we prepare to celebrate NATA’s 75th birthday in December of this year, our future is bright and getting brighter every day. We all look forward to our next 75 years and the key to our enduring success will always be our membership staying informed, engaged and focused on the future. A key component of that continued success is our recent announcement that NATA purchased the Independent Fixed Base Operators Association (IFBOA). On January 16th, we announced a “strategic relationship” with the IFBOA. This gave both teams the time to work through the details of how the merged organizations would more closely coordinate and in some cases, integrate activities.

It is certainly a reasonable question to ask why NATA and IFBOA made this move. Fundamentally, IFBOA was very successful at building a growing organization that featured some highly attractive products and services for its membership—particularly its Workers’ Compensation Insurance product. Additionally, in conversations with many current and former NATA members, a consistent theme emerged of the perception that independent FBOs, not affiliated with a larger chain, did not feel their voices were being heard by NATA.

Over the last three years, NATA worked deliberately to address these concerns. Specifically, NATA recently teamed with AirSure Limited, whose proven track record at bringing highly desirable insurance products to our industry is unmatched. Next, your NATA board of directors actively recruited independent FBO operators to serve on the board to ensure NATA’s policy decisions strike the right balance across the wide range of our regular members. The purchase of IFBOA culminates a huge effort that is already bringing great benefits to all members. Read more about this move in the article on page 27 in this edition of the Aviation Business Journal. In short:

  • Together we are much stronger. Speaking with one unified voice in Washington and elsewhere makes NATA’s advocacy much more effective
  • We will retain the IFBOA brand and continue to bring tailored products, services and advocacy to these non-affiliated FBOs
  • For 2016, the membership dues structure will be completely aligned with most small businesses (under 11 employees) seeing a dues reduction
  • NATA’s board of directors remains committed to a highly diverse representation structure on the NATA board with small, independent FBOs continuing to provide a strong voice on independent business issues

Personally, I feel many in the aviation community are suffering from a bad case of “group think” that pillories both the institution of the FAA and its thousands of highly skilled and dedicated employees.  Others continue to draw false comparisons with countries that have modernized from, in some cases, systems with no or very rudimentary forms of aircraft surveillance (i.e. – no radars – and the attendant poor safety records).

All Hands on Deck
It’s an incredibly busy time in Washington and our lobbying staff is fully engaged in ensuring the process of Congress reauthorizing the FAA keeps aviation business interests on their radar screen. Bill Deere, our Senior Vice President for Government and External Affairs, is leading the effort to ensure the House and the Senate fully understand the vital role that general aviation businesses play in their states, districts and local communities. Please be prepared to provide your personal support in reaching out to the key decision-makers as this process unfolds. These opportunities (and risks) come around about every 3-5 years and delivering a focused message to your elected representatives is key to ensuring we achieve the best possible outcomes.

The Value of NATA Membership
Aviation businesses join and retain their memberships in NATA for a host of reasons. Many of our members possess an understanding that no other organization in Washington is solely dedicated to “protecting and championing” the interests of aviation businesses in Washington. Others rely on our “gold standard” Safety 1st training products to ensure their businesses are achieving the highest levels of aviation safety available anywhere. And still others join or retain their membership for one of our other products and services like the NATA Workers’ Compensation Insurance Program or IFBOA’s much-heralded Workers’ Compensation Insurance Program. New programs like NATA Aviation Solutions, our new deeply discounted NATA membership shipping program with PartnerShip® and the Safety 1st Digital Emergency Response System continue to deliver value across a wide spectrum of member needs. Whatever the reasons are for choosing to join NATA, we will continue to adapt to our membership’s desires as our industry and members’ needs evolve. If you’ve got some new ideas, please call or email us with ways we can better serve you.

Our two most recent conferences are great examples of this needed adaptability. In June, we conducted a highly successful Aviation Business Conference in Washington. According to the feedback from those that attended, this was one of the most highly successful and relevant NATA conferences ever conducted. And the just completed Aviation Business Roundtable, with it’s strategic, policy-level focus for senior executives delivered great insights into key political, economic and strategic topics that will uniquely guide key decisions for senior business leaders in the coming months.

In closing, the entire NATA staff is committed to the belief that as your operating environments and businesses change in the coming years, your trade association must remain agile and adaptable to meet those needs into the future. As always, the key to our success is remaining focused on our members; thus, being engaged, communicating with our staff and letting us know when you see turbulence ahead is something that I ask all of our members to continue to be resolute about. This is your trade association and we continue to be on course and climbing!

Republished from Q3 Aviation Business Journal


FAA Legislation: Impacts to Aviation Businesses

June 26, 2015

Greetings from Washington!  NATA is heavily engaged in advocating for all of our members on serious and far-reaching policy issues rapidly unfolding.  It’s important for all NATA members to understand the critical importance of this advocacy because, as the Voice of Aviation Business, we are in a unique position to speak with clarity on issues directly impacting your businesses in both the short and long terms.

Without a doubt, the highest priority issue we are currently facing is the reauthorization of the FAA. The last FAA reauthorization bill was signed into law on Valentine’s Day in 2012 and is set to expire at the end of this federal fiscal year – September 30. This means that the FAA must once again be reauthorized by Congress to continue operations. For both industry and government, it is vitally important that such long-term legislation be enacted.

Bills such as these are important to all NATA members. The FAA reauthorization bill establishes policy direction for programs like NextGen and contains numerous other provisions intended to make it easier for stakeholders, like you, to interact with the FAA.  In fact, you will see (on the front page of our website) a document, “Major Policy Issues,” developed with the help of our NATA committees. Your input guides our work on this and other important pieces of legislation.

Just like your business, reducing uncertainty for the government enables a longer-term approach to capital investment and system improvements. Recall, the 2012 FAA Reauthorization was enacted after 23 short-term extensions. This is no way to run an agency charged with providing air traffic services and guaranteeing the safety of the travelling public. Add to this the effects of the 2012 government shutdown and the impact of the following spring’s sequester and you can see why ‘business as usual’ in Washington is fundamentally and negatively impacting what is unquestionably the world’s finest airspace system – bar none.

Of course, the impact of sequestration and the other ongoing fiscal fights between the executive and legislative branches goes beyond just aviation. It also encompasses spending for our nation’s defense, support for local law enforcement, Amtrak and poverty programs. Sadly, some deep-pocketed Washington insiders, many with little or no real world operational experience, have elected to use this situation to brazenly advocate for completely restructuring the FAA, proposing to create a separate, user-fee-funded, air traffic control system. Such a “solution” gives us great pause and concern.  As I recently told a Senate committee, general aviation would find itself in constant peril with the travelling public paying ever-increasing fees if an ATC corporation were to be established that is entirely funded via user fees and controlled in perpetuity by a board of industry insiders.

Personally, I feel many in the aviation community are suffering from a bad case of “group think” that pillories both the institution of the FAA and its thousands of highly skilled and dedicated employees.  Others continue to draw false comparisons with countries that have modernized from, in some cases, systems with no or very rudimentary forms of aircraft surveillance (i.e. – no radars – and the attendant poor safety records).

We also cannot underestimate the potential impact of separating air traffic from the agency’s safety functions.  FAA Administrator Huerta recently observed that breaking down stovepipes means close interaction between the operations and safety functions of FAA.  Turning the FAA’s safety organization into a solely regulatory body, including overseeing operational standards, would likely create potential unintended consequences that will undermine many of the efficiencies that would purportedly come from a new air traffic control structure.

Importantly, no one in the aviation community suggests accepting the status quo at FAA.  Like any large organization with an established bureaucracy, change at the FAA can be extremely difficult.  As I stated recently in the Wall Street Journal, “No one in the aviation community suggests accepting the status quo. The injection of private-sector practices has and will continue to greatly improve the FAA’s operating structure and performance.”

However, it appears almost deliberately unnoticed by some that the FAA is bringing online highly-advanced and improving technologies like the recently completed En Route Automation Modernization system and the build out of hundreds of new Automated Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) ground stations throughout the country.  Good changes to our air traffic system are underway and we need to keep the pressure on for more and faster change.

Fortunately, the cavalry is arriving.  Let me express my thanks to those of you participating in the NATA Aviation Business Conference.  While the thrust of the conference is on industry education and networking, the conference begins with an important day of advocacy on Capitol Hill.  Anyone in Washington will tell you, an association’s members are any industry’s best advocates before Congress.

Help us ensure we prevent this academic, sterile, and narrow policy effort from gaining any more traction.  Whether you are joining us in Washington or not, speak loudly, consistently and resolutely to our elected representatives. The power rests entirely within the existing system to fix this problem – we just need our federal government to operate in the manner in which the Constitution intended!

Republished from Q2 Aviation Business Journal


NATA’s New Aviation Business Conference – An Event For All Members

March 11, 2015

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NATA’s New Aviation Business Conference – An Event For All Members
LOCK IN YOUR EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION SAVINGS TODAY!

In June, NATA will host the inaugural Aviation Business Conference in Washington, D.C. This new conference combines the best of our previous Aviation Business & Legislative Conference and Air Charter Summit into one industry-wide event. The Aviation Business Conference provides important perspective, advice, access and information that directly benefit your businesses, including insights from key industry and government policymakers. A key feature of this event enables NATA members from each industry segment an opportunity to connect with one another and with their elected representatives on Capitol Hill.

The action-packed agenda includes sessions on the aviation business outlook, emergency response, social media and NextGen as well as sessions delivering information on the latest regulatory issues before the TSA and FAA. The conference also includes the popular Industry Excellence Awards Presentation Luncheon – an event to celebrate the best and brightest in the general aviation industry.

The conference kicks off with a panel of CEOs from general aviation’s leading associations, immediately followed by a Congressional Fly-In session at the U.S. Capitol. The aviation industry CEOs will share their insights on the current legislative and regulatory environment in Washington and set the stage for a successful Fly-In session with leading lawmakers. We are very excited to offer this rare look into NATA’s and Congress’ efforts on behalf of our industry.

In addition, the NATA Aviation Business Conference provides another unique opportunity to connect directly in a less formal atmosphere with your Members of Congress at the Congressional Reception on Tuesday evening at the U.S. Capitol. NATA represents the interests of our members on Capitol Hill every day but, in order to heighten our impact, we need your help to put a face to our industry. Visiting with your representatives helps demonstrate the vital importance of your business to your community as well as to the nation’s economy.

Finally, please take a few minutes to take advantage of our very attractive early bird registration rate. This will only be available for a short time; so please register to attend before this offer expires. We greatly value your support in helping make your voices heard in Washington.

Please Click to add the NATA Aviation Business Conference to your calendar.

Best Regards,

Tom


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