The Leading Voice of Aviation Business

June 23, 2017

Since taking the helm at NATA, I have come to recognize that our members join the association for a variety of reasons. Some take advantage of the products and services we provide to help their business run safely and successfully. Others find participation in our policy committees or two annual industry conferences an important part of their interaction with, and opportunity to give back to, the industry. Advocacy does not always rise to a first-order consideration. It’s difficult to quantify, though many members recognize the behind-thescenes advocacy work of an association often prevents bad ideas from taking root, still other members see it as a type of insurance—there when you need it. Right now, advocacy is more important than ever, as NATA members confront proposals that threaten our industry from both within the general aviation community and as well as from without.

Bill Deere’s column this quarter discusses how the nation’s airlines proffer various myths as facts in their quest to create an air traffic control corporation. Tim Obitts looks at a legal aspect to NATA advocacy, our recent Supreme Court filing in support of a member company caught up in the IRS interpretation of the applicability of Federal Excise Taxes to aircraft management services. Unfortunately, I need to discuss a threat to our industry from within, specifically the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association’s (AOPA) assertions that FBOs and airports are maximizing their respective revenue streams in a manner that is unfair to pilots. Despite the best efforts of NATA, its member companies and others in the general aviation community, AOPA is requesting the FAA require either FBOs to provide no-cost access to ramps and facilities or airports to provide pilots with free public ramp space.

For those of you unfamiliar with the situation, in late November of last year, the FAA met with Bill and his regulatory team, and informed them that AOPA planned to meet with the agency in December to discuss FBO pricing. That meeting occurred in late December, and shortly after the holidays, NATA was contacted by the FAA requesting we provide our perspective. AOPA’s documents (which we have posted online at http://www.nata.aero) revealed an eleven-month campaign and included a cursory review of leases at a select few public-use airports, as well as pricing information derived from AirNav data, concluding:

  • Widespread FBO industry consolidation is harming the general aviation user
  • A compelling need exists to oversee the business relationship between airports and FBOs
  • Analogized FBOs to utilities—wants FAA to explore oversight mechanisms for prices.

In response to AOPA’s concerns, NATA presented an overview, “The State of the FBO Industry,” (also available on the frontpage of our website) to the FAA. The summary, developed with the assistance of our FBO and air charter members, discusses the costs of operating airport businesses and the many variables that go into determining pricing structure, including capital invested, lease duration, fuel volume, personnel expenses, hours of operation, and traffic types. The FAA is in the process of reviewing our comments as well as those from other stakeholders. I was proud of the NATA staff and members who helped develop our response. This is NATA and its members working in the best tradition of trade associations—meeting rhetoric with fact.

The May edition of AOPA’s Pilot magazine highlighted their FBO initiative and chose to attack the FAA for asking stakeholders to comment on its call for economic regulation of FBOs. The association even criticized NATA for bringing its eleven-month campaign to your attention.

As your president, I take seriously my responsibility to present the facts in a straightforward manner. NATA is not going to be the association that cries, “Wolf!” Despite claims to the contrary, AOPA’s documents speak for themselves. Its presentation compares FBOs to public utilities and requests the agency examine oversight mechanisms in other industries as possible models. That is a pure and straightforward move toward economic regulation. While it claims to support FBOs and the free market, there is no recognition of the fact that some locations require different pricing models. Among other things, the AOPA proposal requires FBOs to assume the security and safety liabilities associated with utilizing your business–without compensation. The decision to assess a facility charge, particularly when there are no purchases of fuel or services, should be yours and not imposed by law or regulation.

Importantly, there are existing FAA mechanisms to address situations where an FBO or airport is violating grant assurance requirements to furnish services on a “reasonable, and not unjustly discriminatory, basis to all users thereof.” Neither NATA nor its members support those violating that important assurance, which would also represent a breach of faith with their customers.

Many of you rightly ask whether I have met with Mark Baker, the President of AOPA. I have; and, while I do not believe it is appropriate to share confidential conversations or comments of others publicly, let’s simply say that, on this issue, we have significantly different positions. However, I can also attest that, on other important issues, the two associations continue their tradition of joint work toward the benefit of all general aviation.

Let me close by saying, “thank you.” I have been heartened by your ongoing support and am gratified by your continuing offers of assistance. Be assured NATA will continue to meet rhetoric with facts in support of free enterprise.

NATA is–and will remain–the leading voice of aviation business.

Republished from the 2017 Q2 Aviation Business Journal.


International, Innovation and Investment in NATA

June 20, 2016

Greetings from Washington! With Congress still looking for a path forward on a long-term FAA reauthorization and the ongoing controversy surrounding the House Transportation Committee proposal to split the FAA into public and private organizations, it is as important as ever to remain engaged, informed and active in helping your NATA staff communicate directly and effectively with your nation’s lawmakers. Bill Deere provides the latest information as we go to press in his column. Please help us ensure our voice remains strong and consistent. NATA continues to make progress on several other fronts. Here are a few highlights.

NATA’s international presence continues to grow rapidly and Safety 1st products are leading the way. Tim Obitts, our Senior Vice President of Membership and Business Development and Mike France, NATA’s Managing Director of Safety and Training just recently returned from attending EBACE in Geneva, Switzerland. NATA’s presence and the buzz around our industry-leading Safety 1st training programs are driving greatly increased international interest and adoption. By working with the International Business Aviation Council to roll out the International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling (IS-BAH), NATA’s footprint is now rapidly growing abroad. To help showcase this continued growth, the NATA staff recently created an interactive electronic world map on NATA’s website for members to see where Safety 1st and NATA are expanding (www.fbostatus.com or www.groundhandlerstatus.com). Please take a look and see which of your competitors is taking advantage of this world class training. In addition, we can use member assistance in reaching out to those in the industry that are advertising NATA membership and Safety 1st Training, yet are not currently participating as either NATA members or Safety 1st graduates. This creates a potential competitive disadvantage for those continuing to support the expansion and continued improvement of this clearly top shelf training. Please let us know if you are aware of anyone mistakenly advertising their participation so we can follow up with some outreach to clear up any misunderstandings.

This quarter’s Aviation Business Journal features a very interesting article on JetSuite’s foray into scheduled Part 135 operations in the Western U.S. As the major airlines continue to reduce service to smaller markets and regional airlines struggle to fill cockpit seats, this is creating vacuums and for some, opportunities. NATA members are all very entrepreneurial and agile. This is clearly evident by those that successfully navigated the post financial crisis downturn. Member companies like JetSuite continue to look for opportunities to create their own niche and hopefully, success, in the marketplace. Many industry veterans might view these innovative efforts with some degree of skepticism, but let’s face it, the economy, consumers and the competitive landscape are all evolving and NATA’s members are always looking for new paths to ensure success.

Over these last few years, NATA’s voice in Washington has grown stronger; however, the need to ensure general aviation businesses continue as a stronger voice in Washington is greater than ever. As I often like to say, for some, a strong trade association is like insurance—you only need it when you need it. Fortunately for all of us, leaders from around the world recognize that by unifying business leaders around a common purpose, the industry’s destiny is much more controllable as long as the foundation is built upon an active and engaged membership.

As NATA kicks off the second annual Aviation Business Conference in Washington, please recommit to attending and supporting the unique opportunity this member-driven conference presents. The ability to speak directly with the TSA Administrator or the FAA’s top regulator or key Congressmen and Senators or to network with colleagues to generate new business opportunities are great reasons to attend this event. Take advantage of the convenience meetings such as this provide to foster multiple parts of your businesses’ growth strategy. The Aviation Business Conference is sure to provide many opportunities and attending helps support NATA’s efforts in Washington.

Please lend your support and plan to spend some time with NATA’s staff while attending any of our events. They all do a great job of helping tell the story of aviation businesses growing, innovating and investing in the economy, both here and around the world.

Republished from Q2 2016 Aviation Business Journal


Not The Answer for Air Traffic Control

March 21, 2016

The following is the full-length response opinion piece by Tom Hendricks’ excerpted by the Denver Post.

The Denver Post’s March 12th editorial, “The remedy for aviation delays,” endorsing a congressional proposal to create a federally chartered air traffic control corporation, is rooted in a number of factual errors that call into question the basis for the Post’s support. In fact, the creation of a federally chartered, not-for-profit air traffic control corporation will erode aviation system safety, stifle the deployment of new technologies and saddle the traveling public with ever increasing travel costs.

The Post’s first factual misstatement centers on the corporation’s governance. Federally chartering an air traffic control corporation, the Post implies, means the U.S. government somehow supervises it. While such corporations are required to provide annual independent audits and reports to Congress, controversies surrounding such corporations often come down to issues of managerial accountability and fiduciary responsibility. The Post itself noted the record of another such corporation, the Post Office. But other examples include Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, the Red Cross and the Smithsonian. It is notable that each of these federally chartered institutions have required in their history some form of government intervention.

Next, the Post implies the corporation would be overseen by the government. Wrong. The corporation would be controlled by a 13-member board of aviation insiders. In fact, one indisputable fact at the legislative hearing on the proposal – the nation’s airlines would have effective control of the board.

The Post also buys into an argument put forward by many of the principal supporters of this proposal, largely academics and economists, about the level of modernization of the air traffic control system. These experts sorely lack the necessary operational experience and expertise required to develop a fully integrated perspective of the “puts and takes” critical to ensuring a balanced approach to safeguarding the unprecedented level of safety performance that is the hallmark of the U.S. air traffic control system.

Among other things, this lack of real world depth of experience blithely leads to simplistic pronouncements such as “a blip is just a blip” when referring to aircraft displayed on air traffic control systems and similarly, that the U.S. is “using World War II technology” as the foundation for our air traffic control system. These views are simplistic, uninformed and clearly point to an academic, not operational view of reality.

The incredibly robust U.S. air traffic control system is modern, highly-integrated and provides for an extremely high level of continuity in the face of disruptive meteorological and technological challenges. This system was designed with the predominant users of the system in mind – major airlines. One must only visit state-of-the-art FAA facilities like the Atlanta Terminal Radar Approach Control Facility, the FAA Command Center in Warrenton, Virginia, the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center in New Jersey and others to realize that these extremely robust and modern facilities leave “World War II” technology in the dust. These facilities, along with the Enroute Automation Modernization-equipped high altitude enroute air traffic control centers, are already fusing multiple sensor sources, including radar, Global Positioning System inputs and other sources into these highly-integrated systems.

We understand the idea of creating an air traffic control corporation is appealing to many, including the Post, as a way to address budgetary stability at the FAA. But doesn’t the Department of Defense deserve a little budgetary stability? What about federal law enforcement or programs to assist the poor with their heating bills, could they use a little budget stability? The FAA isn’t the only part of the federal budget that needs relief from political in-fighting over the budget.

Air traffic control is a monopoly and the governance of this proposed corporation is already precooked in the proposal endorsed by the Post to pick its winners and losers, leaving the consumer and general aviation largely on the outside looking in.


A Time to Reflect… Now Let’s Focus On the Next 75 Years!

December 28, 2015

 

December 28, 2015 marks a very auspicious accomplishment for NATA. We are very pleased to celebrate our 75th Anniversary as the leading voice of aviation businesses in our country, and beyond. In this issue of the Aviation Business Journal, please take a few minutes to read about our storied history in a great article authored by Paul Seidenman & David J. Spanovich, “NATA – For 75 Years, The Voice of General Aviation Business.”

Reflecting back on the early days of what we know today as NATA, I remain amazed and proud that industry leaders—with a clear vision and mission—organized, united and led NATA’s members on a path that continues to ensure our voices are heard clearly in the aviation industry, the Halls of Congress, before federal agencies, and in the states. We will forever be indebted to William A. Ong, Leslie H. Bowman and many others whose vision and dedication remain the hallmarks of our association.

However, these great leaders truly owe their success—and the continuing success of NATA—to the scores of current and former volunteer leaders who over these past 75 years generously donated their time and resources to actively help guide our efforts. These volunteers include NATA board members, committee members and the many others we call upon to provide views on a host of issues. As I’ve repeatedly said over these last few years, this is your association and volunteering to participate helps guarantee our success well into the future. The NATA staff needs your expertise when advocating with our colleagues, at the FAA, and on Capitol Hill. Clear, well-defined policy priorities succeed when driven by NATA members.

Looking ahead, the future of NATA is bright as we embark on our next 75 years. There are several guideposts that will help ensure we remain relevant, respected and a valuable resource for our members and the nation’s policymakers.

  • Growing our suite of safety enhancing training products will be front and center moving forward. Safety 1st is recognized as the gold standard for general aviation businesses. NATA will continue to thoughtfully expand this highly beneficial program into other areas to ensure our members continue to enjoy cutting edge products that drive safety improvements and translate to the bottom line. This will become particularly more important considering FAA Administrator Michael Huerta’s commitment to moving the agency from an “enforcement” regime to one of “compliance.” This “sea change” dovetails extremely well with safety management principles now rapidly maturing. Even though the FAA’s philosophy shift will likely take years to fully implement, programs like Safety 1st will become ever more vital to ensuring our members properly manage risk in their businesses.
  • Moving forward, NATA must remain agile in a changing business environment, must stay relevant to both members and in policy debates in Washington and beyond and most importantly, must continue to be responsive to our members’ needs. We will work with NATA’s board to ensure our by-laws and organizational structure continue to demonstrate the
    most effectiveness and value for NATA’s members.
  • NATA will continue to actively manage strategic rela­tionships to ensure our voice is heard. We’ll do this by being good listeners, solution-oriented, non-partisan and closing on commitments we make. These are long-term commitments that will garner respect and influ­ence to ensure The Voice of Aviation Business remains a key player in Washington and beyond.
  • The recently announced purchase of the Independent Fixed Base Operators Association (IFBOA) is already jumpstarting our membership rolls and bringing a vitally important constituency to NATA, ensuring we truly speak as one voice on Capitol Hill. In the coming months, this move, along with our updated products and services will ensure we remain a vibrant and grow­ing trade association for many years to come.

In closing, it’s an honor to lead your trade association and to work with our highly dedicated NATA staff and volun­teers. This is a winning combination that is going to ensure our future remains bright. Please participate and remain engaged in NATA’s activities. We need your great ideas and guidance to help ensure The Voice of Aviation Business grows even stronger for our members!

Republished from Q4 2015 Aviation Business Journal


NATA’s New Aviation Business Conference – An Event For All Members

March 11, 2015

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NATA’s New Aviation Business Conference – An Event For All Members
LOCK IN YOUR EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION SAVINGS TODAY!

In June, NATA will host the inaugural Aviation Business Conference in Washington, D.C. This new conference combines the best of our previous Aviation Business & Legislative Conference and Air Charter Summit into one industry-wide event. The Aviation Business Conference provides important perspective, advice, access and information that directly benefit your businesses, including insights from key industry and government policymakers. A key feature of this event enables NATA members from each industry segment an opportunity to connect with one another and with their elected representatives on Capitol Hill.

The action-packed agenda includes sessions on the aviation business outlook, emergency response, social media and NextGen as well as sessions delivering information on the latest regulatory issues before the TSA and FAA. The conference also includes the popular Industry Excellence Awards Presentation Luncheon – an event to celebrate the best and brightest in the general aviation industry.

The conference kicks off with a panel of CEOs from general aviation’s leading associations, immediately followed by a Congressional Fly-In session at the U.S. Capitol. The aviation industry CEOs will share their insights on the current legislative and regulatory environment in Washington and set the stage for a successful Fly-In session with leading lawmakers. We are very excited to offer this rare look into NATA’s and Congress’ efforts on behalf of our industry.

In addition, the NATA Aviation Business Conference provides another unique opportunity to connect directly in a less formal atmosphere with your Members of Congress at the Congressional Reception on Tuesday evening at the U.S. Capitol. NATA represents the interests of our members on Capitol Hill every day but, in order to heighten our impact, we need your help to put a face to our industry. Visiting with your representatives helps demonstrate the vital importance of your business to your community as well as to the nation’s economy.

Finally, please take a few minutes to take advantage of our very attractive early bird registration rate. This will only be available for a short time; so please register to attend before this offer expires. We greatly value your support in helping make your voices heard in Washington.

Please Click to add the NATA Aviation Business Conference to your calendar.

Best Regards,

Tom


Greetings from Washington!

July 2, 2014

NATA is off to a great start in 2014 and there’s much activity to update our membership on.

We’re thrilled with the arrival of Bill Deere as our Senior Vice President of Government and External Affairs. Bill brings a wealth of Washington policy experience with him. He comes to NATA from the U.S. Telecom Association and did previous stints at the Department of State as a Deputy Assistant Secretary responsible for Senate liaison, two tours at the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association in their government affairs shop and also as a member of the staff of Iowa Representative Jim Lightfoot. It was here that Bill gained valuable expertise working with the House Appropriations Committee. This experience will serve NATA and our members well as we approach key legislation, including the upcoming reauthorization of the FAA. Bill and his lovely wife, Theresa, reside in Silver Spring, Maryland, so Bill is very much looking forward to an easier commute with our move to Washington.

Speaking of the move, we were very pleased to sell our current location last fall and are currently leasing that facility until we move. Our new location is in the heart of Washington, on Connecticut Avenue, one half block from Lafayette Park and the White House. We’ll be right across the street from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. So, if you’re in the area, please plan to stop by our new home! Our architect is designing some extra space for members to “hang their hats” when they’re in the DC area. This move is part of our strategic repositioning in Washington and will serve us well for the long term.

Here’s a quick rundown on what we’ve been working on so far this year:

• We instituted our new Member Support Level Program in January. Our aim was to “unbundle” our products and services and permit our members to have more of a choice in how they support NATA. This has been a great success and we’re seeing more and more companies select the levels of support that provide the most value for their individual businesses, all while receiving significant discounts.

• February included a meeting with Department of Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx where we had a full discussion on NATA’s mission and the importance of General Aviation to the nation’s economy; and we offered NATA’s help in developing and implementing policies that improve aviation safety and help our members win in the marketplace. I was also fortunate to attend the Bob Hoover gala that included a dinner where several notable inductees entered the Hoover Hall of Honor, followed the next evening by a tribute and the premier of a Paramount Documentary of Bob’s lifetime achievements. Bob is a legend in our aviation world and it was an honor to join many other heroes such as astronauts Jim Lovell, Gene Cernan and Buzz Aldrin. Several key NATA members were also in attendance.

• March started off quickly with the Aviation Business and Legislative Conference. Although we were challenged by miserable weather in Washington, the event was a great success. Other visits that month included the Women in Aviation, International Conference in Orlando, a speech to the Minnesota Aviation Trades Association, and a panel at Aviation Pros Live in Las Vegas. While in Washington for a few days in between traveling, I was interviewed by the FAA’s Management Advisory Council on a wide range of issues, including the possibility of FAA structural reform, something that’s been gaining traction in Washington, D.C. policy circles.

• April began with my first visit to Sun ‘N Fun in Lakeland, Florida. It was a fabulous event! I flew down in a Saratoga and was on a Town Hall panel with the co-chair of the House General Aviation Caucus, Representative Sam Graves (MO), AOPA President Mark Baker and HAI President Matt Zuccaro.

Just last month, we were once again excited to host a fundraising event for the Veterans Airlift Command (VAC) and other veterans groups at the Air Charter Summit. Last year, working with VAC’s Chairman, CEO and Founder Walt Fricke, we raised over $20,000 for this incredibly worthy organization. I am proud to report that we raised nearly $50,000 this year. As a long-serving veteran, I have a special place in my heart for these groups. I spent nearly nine years on active duty in the Navy and another eighteen in the Air Force Reserve. In fact, the week before the Air Charter Summit, I joined my Navy squadron mates from 30 years ago for a reunion in Newport, RI. Our host was the squadron’s “youngster,” who is now a Rear Admiral and President of the Naval War College. Thirty years ago in April, we lost one of the finest fighter pilots, naval officers, fathers and gentlemen I’ve ever met. Lieutenant Commander Tim Murphy died in a tragic aircraft accident during a catapult shot in the Indian Ocean in month four of a five-month cruise to the Northern Arabian Sea. Tim had a wonderful wife and four young children and it was simply devastating to all involved. His entire family joined us in Newport in June to toast a few in “Muff’s” honor and memory. For veterans, our service is mostly defined by honor, fellowship and sacrifice. This is why our support of the VAC is so exciting, heartwarming and a privilege for us all. Please give this worthy cause your support!

Visit or return to NATA’s website: http://www.nata.aero


Back in the Saddle…….Again

March 27, 2014

It’s been over a year and a half since taking the reins as NATA’s new president. Just after arriving, I conducted several media interviews. One of those resulting articles, written by Paul Lowe at AIN was titled, “Hendricks Takes Over Left Seat at NATA.” It was a catchy metaphor but ended up having a bit more impact than expected. For reasons not clear at the time, Paul’s headline nagged at me a bit until I realized how much I’ve been missing being in a real left seat. With numerous visits to NATA members now complete, it’s clear that there is indeed a shared passion for this great industry. Our members are living it every day. As the leader of our association, learning from those “closer to the action” is providing great value and perspective.

As most of you know, my background prior to arriving at NATA was in commercial and military aviation. Even though I began my flying in 1973 in General Aviation (GA), it had been decades since I’d spent much time flying around the pattern and talking on Unicom. As a firm believer in the crawl- walk- run approach to unfamiliar things, I’ve greatly benefited from time spent listening to and learning with NATA members about flying once again in the GA environment. Add to this the amazing array of personal devices available to improve situational awareness and improve safety margins, and it can be intimidating.

Another emerging theme for a “new guy” is the cutting-edge work being done by several flight training organizations. Companies like Redbird, ATP and others are filling a vital need for our industry and ensuring we attract and retain people bitten with the aviation bug like the rest of us. From our members, there is much discussion on the challenges of operating successful flight training businesses and continued concern over the cost of flight training, including our limited supply of future aviation professionals. Last fall, I was invited out to the AV-ED Flight School in Leesburg, Virginia, to fly some profiles in their Cessna 172 Redbird simulator which was equipped with a very capable glass cockpit EFIS. The motion, visual, avionics and quality of the instruction was something I’d never before seen in GA. The last simulators I’d been exposed to were Level-D full-motion sims for B-767s and 757s.For the price, simplicity and ease of use, the Redbird device seemed the perfect balance between affordability, capability and adaptability of our training paradigm to suit a more tech-savvy generation of aviators.

After this experience, I reached out to Todd Willinger, Redbird’s CEO to arrange a visit to his company in Texas. On display, at both their Austin headquarters and training facility in San Marcos, was unbridled entrepreneurship and world-class innovation. The founders of Redbird certainly have the vision and hunger to fundamentally change the way we train in General Aviation. Frankly, it made me proud that we live in a country where bright people with bright ideas can take risks and create something so innovative. And, Redbird is just one example of NATA members probing and building new ways to develop innovative and sustainable flight training business models.

So where is this leading? Well, after a nearly four-year absence from regular flying, I’ve finally jumped back into the space where our membership resides every day. Last summer, Dan Montgomery and Bobby Beem of Montgomery Aviation, very active NATA members, gave me a tour of their business operations and granted a little right-seat time in the Cessna 310Q, flying around Central and Northern Indiana. In the military, we used to joke about the new guys having “100-knot minds in a 400-knot world.” This is exactly how I felt with Dan and Bobby; but the old desire and instincts were beginning to awaken from a deep hibernation. Late last year, I was also able to fly a couple of hours in a PA-46 Malibu with Dave Conover at SkyTech in Westminster, Maryland. SkyTech is also a very active NATA member; and spending time there with John Foster was very insightful. But, the Malibu flying was a blast and cemented in my mind that the time had come to get serious about getting back in the saddle.

I’m happy to report that I’ve passed my first flight review after a four-year absence and also knocked out an instrument proficiency check. Everyone I’ve interacted with has been superb, professional and enthusiastic. This is extremely energizing for a graying pilot like myself. It’s also been good to listen to a lot of great advice from many highly experienced pilots. As a commercial pilot, weather cancellations for aircraft limitations were rare. For the most part, the aircraft were capable of operating in almost any IMC condition. Other factors such as runway, airspace, NAVAIDs and airport availability most often limited operations. I’ve gotten a great deal of sage advice on changing this mindset as I settle back into GA flying. “Just say no” is a refrain that’s come across loud and clear. The new paradigm I’m coming to grips with, in the class of aircraft I’m flying, is that the aircraft can indeed be the most limiting factor. Checking one’s ego and being willing to accept occasional disruptions is a must to ensure safety is never compromised.

In the meantime, I hope to see you as I cruise around in a rented Saratoga HP. I’ve already got my iPad Mini with Foreflight and an ADS-B box in the aircraft and it is amazing to see the wonderful information available at our fingertips. Even though the new technology is utterly impressive, what amazes me the most is how many bright, motivated and friendly people I continue to encounter when I’m out visiting with our members. This truly is a special segment of aviation and I’m thrilled and re-energized by the entire experience. Fly Safely! Tom

Article first appeared in NATA’s first quarter Aviation Business Journal. Click here to read more.